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Your assignment is to take six (6) of the following eight (8) aspects to create

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Your assignment is to take six (6) of the following eight (8) aspects to create a profile of life in the Philadelphia district that has been assigned to you. In a paragraph or two identify and explain the significance, details, and importance to the city for each of the element that you have chosen. In addition, hyperlink at least two of the key points that you have included in your description. Over the course of your essay you need to include at least one each of the following: data chart/graph, district map, timeline, video file or GIF,  Content: This is not a cut and paste content assignment. You certainly may include quotes from your sources, by you may not simply drop in entire sections of secondary content. I’m looking for your words and emphasis, along with your decision on how to most effectively to present your content. Be sure to give credit to your source(s) when you quote. Bibliography: Include the name of the source (with a person’s name if the source is credited) and the link to the source page at the end of your essay. Here’s an example. Sample Bibliography Blackbottom, “History of Northern Liberties: Immigration arrivals/ Population Explosion.” https://theblackbottom.wordpress.com/communities/northern-liberties/history/ Collemecine, Kirsti.  Encyclopedia of Greater Philadelphia, “Arthur Mervyn; or, Memoirs of the Year 1793.” https://philadelphiaencyclopedia.org/essays/arthur-mervyn/ Woodall, Peter. Hidden City: Exploring Philadelphia’s Urban Landscape, “Northern Liberties: Then and Now.” https://hiddencityphila.org/2012/08/northern-liberties-then-now/ Important Final Note: Create a final paragraph in which you select and explain how your district illustrates one key element of the Penn/Hinkie Process linked in the Assignment (Power Point Penn). I have assigned you a specific district that in the 1854 Consolidation Map was incorporated into the city of Philadelphia or a neighboring district that has been in existence and will eventually be consolidated into the City of Philadelphia. Just a note, you are not acting as a team; this is an individual assignment although you may decide to share your research with the other person researching the district. Philadelphia Districts and Hypertext Assignment District of the City:  Student District Assignments 1. (Port) Richmond District: Jathiah & Nick 2. Olde City District: McKenley & Genesis 3. Kensington District: Emma & Minal  4. Spring Garden District: Agniele & Liron 5. Moyamensing District: Gemma & Stella 6. Southwark District: Morgan & Zyella 7. Germantown Township: Mohamed & Lucas 8. Passyunk / Kingsessing Township: Joe & Ryan 9. Penn District / Penn Township: Erica The example below is based on the Northern Liberties district of the city. Old Northern Liberties 1808   1. Location and Significance of the Location: Two tributary creeks of the Delaware River have traditionally bound Northern Liberties. It borders the north end of the city as William Penn laid it out in his original 1684 drawing of the streets plan for Philadelphia. The first white inhabitants of Northern Liberties were here before Penn arrived making it one of the earliest section of the future city to be developed. In 1682 Penn lured investors to his city by offering free estates north of the city’s Vine Street boundary. Coates Street, named for early resident William Coats (William Coats Family Registry & Documents), later changed to Fairmount Avenue ran through the middle of the district. In the early 1700s Philadelphians referred to the district as the North End of the city, later referred to as Northern Liberties (today residence refer to it as NoLibs). As one of the earliest settlements in the area, Northern Liberties has a rich colonial history. Urban redevelopment has changed the face of the neighborhood; it has also yielded artifacts from early Philadelphia such as the pottery this couple has recently unearthed. The district is bordered on the east by the Delaware River where farmers would bring their meats and produce by flatboats to market them in the city. As time went on, north and south streets such as Second, Third, and Fourth were extended from the original street plan into Northern Liberties. 2. Population and Ethnicities: The original inhabitant of the Northern Liberties area were the Lenape tribe. In 1682 William Penn and Lenape Chief Tamanend signed the Treaty of Shackamaxon under the Great Birch Tree at  what is now Penn Treaty Park. By 1850, the demographics and population of the District had more than doubled, to nearly 410,000. Newcomers were looking farther afield, gravitating to new centers of industry springing up in the Northern Liberties and Kensington while 120,000 residents crammed into the City proper (compared to around 60,000 today). New workers were increasingly immigrants. While Irish and German workers accounted for only 10% of the workforce in 1836, by 1850, nearly 40% of wage earners hailed from those two countries. Data from the Philadelphia Social History Project shows a region where nearly three of every five residents worked as artisans rather than professionals, proprietors or laborers, and the only region of the city in the 1860 and 1870 census to be less than half native American. Those criteria suggest a region in which small workplaces and residences were intertwined with the work tending to be highly skilled crafts, which during the nineteenth century, were increasingly concentrated in factories to the west of the market on Second Street, corresponding to the zone added to the Northern Liberties in 1803. 3. Politics and Political Issues: The Nativist Riots of 1844 stemmed from anti-Irish, anti-Catholic sentiments from surrounding districts including the city district. Irish Catholics especially new immigrants were perceived as a threat to the Protestant/American way of life that had permeated Philadelphia from its founding.  The influx of Irish especially during the 1830s spread civil unrest in Northern Liberties, Kensington, and Spring Garden. One important effect of the Nativist Riots was to finally merge the outlying areas into Philadelphia proper. The other national political event in the district’s history came out of the “Bank War” begun by President Andrew Jackson in vetoing the charter for the Second National Bank. In February of 1834 hundreds of men from the Northern Liberties issued a series of resolutions aimed at addressing the recession that followed. 4. Manufacturing and Industry: Northern Liberties became home to manufacturing and industries such as breweries, candle and wax-works, cotton and woolen mills, slaughterhouses, and tanneries. During the Nineteenth Century as industry grew, factories producing brass and ironworks as well as marble-works, along with coal and lumberyards made Philadelphia the “Workshop of the World.” The 1830s and 1840s saw Northern Liberties as the nation’s largest producer of saws as sawmills sprung up throughout the district. Henry Disston was one of Philadelphia’s leading saw makers throughout the mid- to late nineteenth century. By the Civil War, his Keystone Saw Works had become the largest saw manufacturer in the United States. The 1860s saw Northern Liberties as one of the largest sugar producers in the region as home to the Jack Frost Sugar Company when German immigrant John Hilgert built a small shop at Fifth and Girard and began to manufacture molasses. The building was imploded  February of 1999 to make room for the Sugarhouse Casino that now stands on the site of the old sugar refinery. 5. Religious Life: Free African Americans built an early church, the African Zoar Church at Fourth and Brown Streets in Northern Liberties rather than travel into the city and with Black churches came a steady flow of African Americans until, by the 1850s, the number exceeded that of the Southwark District. By the late 1790s the expanding Jewish population brought the first synagogue in Northern Liberties in 1802 at a location near Second and Vine. With ever increasing population the congregation resettled into large quarters on Second Street in 1847.  The Society of Friends settled into a meetinghouse located on Greene Street in the western half of the district in the early 1800s. The early 1800s saw a number of Protestant faiths build their churches in the community, including Presbyterians, Lutherans, and Baptists. The First Presbyterian congregation was opened in May of 1833 and went on to become the “mother church” for all Presbyterians in the Philadelphia region. 6. Crime and Criminal Activity: Gangs in the northern areas of the city including Northern Liberties threatened the peace of the district.  Composed of teenagers and young men, they battled for their “turf,” frequently terrorizing passersby while covering walls and fences with gang related graffiti. Gangs like The Killers gang became the title of a novel by George Lippard Organized crime resulted from a lack of effective law enforcement, agencies so small that they were useless in combatting the increasing violence. Multiple riots occurred throughout the 1840s, the worst being the Nativist Riots of 1844 imortalized in the depiction of the death of George Schifler. City officials came to realize that small civilian militias unable or unwilling to contain the violence, often directed against Blacks and Irish Catholics. Ultimately the City Council authorized a battalion of artillery, a regiment of infantry, and a full troop of horse soldiers totaling over a thousand men to patrol Northern Liberties, Spring Garden, Kensington, Moyamensing, Southwark and other outlying areas. 7. Important Person, Place, or Event: Philadelphia was home to American writer Edgar Allan Poe (biography) for a six year period in which he lived in a handful of different locations.

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